Posts Tagged 'safety'

Independence Day Weekend Reminder: Fireworks and Pets Don’t Mix

As we approach the holiday weekend, please remember that July 4th celebrations can be a potentially dangerous and frightening time for pets. While fireworks are not allowed within the Municipality of Anchorage, many people travel with their pets to see family, camp, and enjoy the holiday. Help ensure the health and safety of your pet by following these tips:

  • Keep your pet in a SECURE and quiet setting, like your home (make sure all windows and doors are closed);
  • Turning on a television or radio can mask the noise of fireworks, helping keep your pet calm;
  • Be certain your pet has a current MOA dog license, a current identification tag, and its rabies tag securely fastened to its collar;
  • In the unfortunate event that your pet does escape, check with the Anchorage Animal Care and Control Center ASAP; and
  • While the Center can be reached by phone at 343-8122, it is always best to come in person to look for your dog or cat every 2-3 days, as no one can identify your animal better than you.

AACCC will be closed to the public on Friday, July 4. We will reopen for our regular hours on Saturday, July 5. AACCC normal business hours are Monday-Friday, 11:00am-7:00pm and Saturday-Sunday, 10:00am-6:00pm. Please direct further questions to AACCC at 343-8122 or access information on our website, www.muni.org/animal.

Pets and Fireworks Don’t Mix!

New Year’s Eve Weekend Reminder:  Fireworks and Pets Don’t Mix

As we approach the holiday, please remember that New Year’s Eve celebrations can be a potentially dangerous and frightening time for pets.  While fireworks are not allowed in the Municipality of Anchorage, many people travel with their pets to see family and enjoy the holiday.  Help ensure the health and safety of your pet by following these tips:

Keep your pet in a SECURE and quiet setting, like your home (make sure all windows and doors are closed);

  • Turning on a television or radio can mask the noise of fireworks, helping keep your pet calm;
  • Be certain your pet has a current MOA dog license, a current identification tag, and its rabies tag securely fastened to its collar;
  • In the unfortunate event that your pet does escape, check with the Anchorage Animal Care and Control Center ASAP; and 
  • While the Center can be reached by phone at 343-8122, it is always best to come in person to look for your dog every 2-3 days, as no one can identify your animal better than you.

Please direct further questions to Anchorage Animal Care and Control at 343-8122 or access information on our website, http://www.muni.org/animal.

New Year’s Eve Weekend Reminder: Fireworks and Pets Don’t Mix

As we approach the holiday weekend, please remember that New Year’s Eve celebrations can be a potentially dangerous and frightening time for pets. 

This year, fireworks will be allowed, with some restrictions, in the Municipality from 9:30pm on December 31 until 1:00am on January 1st.  Also, many people travel with their pets to see family and enjoy the holiday.  Help ensure the health and safety of your pet by following these tips: 

Holiday Pet Safety Tips

Thanksgiving is two days out and many people are already thinking about the Christmas decorations!  Keep your pet’s health and safety in mind as the holiday dinners, lights and fun get underway with these tips from the ASPCA:  http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/pet-care-tips/holiday-safety-tips.aspx

Holly, Jolly and Oh-So-Safe! Of course you want to include your furry companions in the festivities, pet parents, but as you celebrate this holiday season, try to keep your pet’s eating and exercise habits as close to their normal routine as possible. And be sure to steer them clear of the following unhealthy treats, toxic plants and dangerous decorations:

O Christmas Tree Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.

Continue reading ‘Holiday Pet Safety Tips’

Five Fire Safety Tips for People with Pets

With winter setting in, there have been several stories in the local news about fires starting in homes due things such as heaters having problems and people trying to thaw frozen pipes.  It made us think this is a good time to bring up fire safety tips for pet owners.  Here’s some good info from the ASPCA:  http://www.aspca.org/Blog/five-fire-safety-tips-for-people-with-pets.aspx

We shudder to think about it. But according to the National Fire Protection Association, each year more than 1,000 house fires are accidentally started by pets. Please take a minute to pet proof your home against potential fire hazards—it could mean the difference between life and death for your four-legged friends.

Secure wires and cords. Continue reading ‘Five Fire Safety Tips for People with Pets’

Winter Pet Care

This is information we posted last year, but it is that time again!  This covers some basic cold weather info for both dogs AND cats from the American Animal Hospital Association at their website:  www.healthypet.com.  Also, Volunteer Metis previously posted a great article on Quality Caretaking in the Cold for our pets.  If you haven’t read it yet, you definitely should! 

Cold weather can be hard on pets, just like it can be hard on people. Sometimes owners forget that their pets are just as accustomed to the warm shelter of the indoors as they are. Some owners will leave their animals outside for extended periods of time, thinking that all animals are adapted to live outdoors. This can put their pets in danger of serious illness. There are things you can do to keep your animal warm and safe.

Continue reading ‘Winter Pet Care’

National Dog Bite Prevention Week

While it is true that most dogs don’t bite, even the cuddliest, fuzziest, sweetest pup can bite if provoked.  From nips to bites to actual attacks, dog bites are a serious problem.

This year, May 15-21 is National Dog Bite Prevention Week.  This is an important time for parents to talk to their children about how to be safe around dogs and for dog owners to put some thought into training and other activities that can help prevent this problem.

Here is some great information from the American Veterinary Medical Association: http://www.avma.org/public_health/dogbite/

Did you know that …

  • 4.7 million people in this country are bitten by dogs every year [In Anchorage, we have around 500 reported dogs bites annually!]
  • children are by far the most common victims
  • 800,000 Americans receive medical attention for dog bites each year
  • children are far more likely to be severely injured; approximately 400,000 receive medical attention every year
  • most dog bites affecting young children occur during everyday activities and while interacting with familiar dogs
  • senior citizens are the second most common dog bite victims

There are a number of things that you can do to avoid dog bites, ranging from properly training and socializing your pet to educating your children on how, or if, they should approach a dog. Information is one of the best cures for this public health crisis.

What’s a dog owner to do?

Pet Water Safety

As the weather warms and our dogs are outside with us more, please keep in mind the following information from the American Animal Hospital Association:  http://www.healthypet.com/RelocationAndTravel/ViewTravelArticle.aspx?art_key=6d4263be-8573-437a-ba58-55d3054a541a

Water sports and recreation can be a terrific way to spend some quality fun time with your pet. Many dogs can enjoy the water for fun. Although cats can swim, they don’t like it, despite what you’ve seen on The Adventures of Milo and Otis, explains Sandra Pettit, MS, DVM, AAHA Board nominee and veterinarian with the Milton Animal Hospital, Milton, Florida.

Whether you’re considering taking your pooch on a boat, or to the ocean, lake, swimming pool, pond or ice, make sure you follow these simple common sense steps suggested by Dr. Pettit to keep your pet safe.

Continue reading ‘Pet Water Safety’

Safe Car Travel for Your Pet

From the American Animal Hospital Association website, www.healthypet.comhttp://www.healthypet.com/RelocationAndTravel/ViewTravelArticle.aspx?art_key=840fdd4c-eba4-4896-89e6-a5496bb6ab8c

Let’s say you’re driving 35 miles an hour with a loose 60 pound dog in your car. If you stop suddenly or crash, that dog can have the impact of 2,700 pounds. This and other alarming facts posted at Bark Buckle Up show the need to restrain your pet while driving.

Loose pets are in danger of getting hurt during an accident. They also can cause an accident by distracting their owners.

More states require animals to be restrained in a moving car. But what is the best restraint? Below are suggestions from Tom Kendall, DVM. A longtime veterinarian, Dr. Kendall is an AAHA Board Member and practice manager at the Arden Animal Hospital, Inc., in Sacramento, California.

Carrier vs. Pet Seatbelt

Continue reading ‘Safe Car Travel for Your Pet’

The Five Things You Need to Know About Ice Melts

Some great information from the ASPCA News Alert

Most of us know how to protect our pups in freezing temperatures (doggie sweaters, here we come!) but not everyone is aware of another winter danger for dogs: the ubiquitous rock salt used to melt ice. In the past five years, the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) has received hundreds of calls about ice melt exposure. Here’s everything you need to know to keep Fido safe from salt melts till spring:

1. Ice melts are poisonous to dogs if ingested. Dogs who lick their paws after a wintry walk may be exposing themselves to toxic chemicals like potassium chloride, magnesium chloride, calcium carbonate and calcium magnesium acetate that are present in many ice melts. Consumption of ice melts can be lethal, but only if your dog ingests large quantities.

Continue reading ‘The Five Things You Need to Know About Ice Melts’


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